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Security Authors: Ambuj Kumar, Shelly Palmer, Slavik Markovich, Elizabeth White, Greg Ness

Related Topics: Cloud Computing, Security Journal, CyberSecurity Journal

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Nanokrieg: The Next Trillion Dollar War | @CloudExpo #Cloud #Security

Much of the efforts done so far in cybersecurity are nothing more than building an ineffective Maginot Line for cyber-defenses

This is an excerpt of some key concepts from his upcoming book, NANOKRIEG: BEYOND BLITZKRIEG, a book defining the changes in Military Infrastructure, Strategies and Tactics needed to win the War on Terrorism. It includes chapters on cyberterrorism and cyberwarfare.

If we are involved in a cyber-war, where are the frontlines? What are the defenses that will work? Much of the efforts done so far in cybersecurity are nothing more than building an ineffective Maginot Line for cyber-defenses.

Should we be spending more time (and money) in figuring out cyberwarfare and protecting critical infrastructure instead of conventional warfare?

Nanokrieg: A War Won and Lost in Microseconds
When it comes to NANOKRIEG, attacks aren't measured in days or even hours. A whole cyberattack can last only a couple of seconds - or less. Battlefields are now in server farms, data centers, and across the network infrastructure.

Cyberwarfare is the perfect tool for those engaged in asymmetrical warfare where their resources are inferior to their enemies. All they need is a small cadre of experts.

As Sun Tzu, the author of The Art of War stated, "Quickness is the essence of the war."

In less than a second, 1000s of pinpoint cyberattacks on different targets can be executed by high-speed transaction processors. Stocks could plummet. Exchanges could be totally manipulated and accounts could be wiped out - or transferred. Certain controls in power grids and other utilities, like maximum temperature levels or power load levels, could be overridden.

All of this can be done without regiments of trained soldiers or tons of supporting equipment. Some major attacks could happen and no one would even know about them. Most are not reported - and you can understand why

Weapons do not have to be flown into a battle zone or brought in by big transport ships, they are carried in by the network. Trojan horses, worms, viruses, denial-of-service attacks, and other destructive malware weapons do not need huge supporting logistics or long timeframes to assemble to "hit the beach." They can be sent off in a microsecond on an electronic pathway to the "war zone."

D-Day has become D-Microsecond. Welcome to "Electronic Jihad." The asymmetrical warfare approach in the electronic age.

Riches and treasures do not need heavy equipment, trains, or convoys of trucks to pull them out, they can get taken out on the network as well. Electronic valuables and critical information have no physical weight, just virtual value.

Eighty-Six Percent of Organizations Are Vulnerable - Is Yours?
No company or financial firm wants to announce their protective measures are inadequate and that all their internal confidential information has been compromised. They would lose customers in a heartbeat.

When it comes to cybersecurity, 86% of organizations have inadequate capabilities according to a 2016 study performed by HPE (Hewlett-Packard).

We have already seen in multiple instances,where people's credit card and personal information are stolen. Where were the safeguards? Where were the defenses against attacks?

According to IBM, almost one out of four financial institutions (23.8%) are still exposed. Is your money sitting in one of these institutions?

There are no Frontlines any more, only virtual lines within electronic borders in NANOKRIEG.

As I have mentioned in a previous whitepaper, "The speed of response equals victory, or at least, survival."

As I said in an earlier column:

Cloud computing, the Internet of Things (IoT), the Internet of Everything (IoE), 5G Networks, and other cutting-edge concepts will not materialize successfully in the future, if the supporting infrastructure is not solid and resilient against attacks. If it does have gaping holes in its defensive architectural framework against cyberattacks and EMP, it will fail.

More time and resources need to be expended in the area of organizational cybersecurity and critical infrastructure security. If 86% of the organizations are ill-prepared, then a cyberattack would probably be successful and that is not acceptable.

"Hit the Beach!" has been replaced with, "Hit the Grid!"


Carlini will be the Keynote Speaker on Intelligent Infrastructure & Cybersecurity at the CABA Intelligent Buildings and Digital Homes Forum in San Diego on April 26.

Carlini's book will be out at the end of this year. His current book, LOCATION LOCATION CONNECTIVITY is available on Amazon

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.TWITTER.com/JAMESCARLINI

Copyright 2016 - James Carlini

More Stories By James Carlini

James Carlini, MBA, a certified Infrastructure Consultant, keynote speaker and former award-winning Adjunct Professor at Northwestern University, has advised on mission-critical networks. Clients include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, GLOBEX, and City of Chicago’s 911 Center. An expert witness in civil and federal courts on network infrastructure, he has worked with AT&T, Sprint and others.

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.twitter.com/JAMESCARLINI

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