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Asymmetric Warfare Includes Cyberwarfare By @JamesCarlini | @CloudExpo #Cloud

Are your enterprise’s clouds resilient to Cyber Storms? Or are they susceptible to a Cyber-Tsunami of hostile transactions?

This is an excerpt of some concepts from his upcoming book, Nanokrieg: Beyond Blitzkrieg, a book covering the changes in Military Infrastructure, Strategies and Tactics needed to win the War on Terrorism. It includes chapters on cyberterrorism and cyberwarfare.

With the latest terrorist occurrences in Brussels, Belgium, and Paris, France, on hard targets, we tend to equate terrorism with overt acts of small groups in shootings, stabbings, and bombings of people in order to disrupt their day-to-day lives and create fear in a region's economy.

This is referred to as "asymmetrical warfare", where one enemy has a totally different level of resources and personnel to apply. Both sides are not equal in strength, but the weaker enemy makes up for it with non-traditional and guerilla warfare tactics to defeat and demoralize their enemy.

Iron-Clad Clouds Are a Must in Today's Terrorist Environment
In another facet of asymmetric warfare, the whole tactic of cyberterrorism thrives as another tool to disrupt economic commerce and put fear into those trying to accomplish business and transactions on the Internet. In cyberterrorism, you don't need a huge computer, a large programming staff, or a large fully redundant data center to inflict huge problems into an organization's or country's cyber-economy and intelligent infrastructure.

Most enterprise clouds and their platforms are not resistant to mass cyberattacks. Is your company's enterprise network a Digital Alamo environment waiting to happen with its administrators not even aware of all its vulnerabilities?

If you are using a third-party cloud service, are they as secure as their glossy brochures claim their services to be?

As warfare, strategies, and tactics were being redefined as World War II was coming to an end, tactics for large military components were being redeveloped and shifted to smaller, less-equipped units. Resources and available manpower were dwindling. You had to do more with less as far as personnel and resources.

As the war started to end in 1945, some in Germany did not want to give up and, instead, wanted to keep the war and the Third Reich going. One of the key people in developing a new type of warfare for Germany at the end of the war was Otto Skorzeny, a Nazi SS officer who did some very high-level work leading commando-type raids as well as developing a new style of warfare.

"You cannot waste time on feinting and sidestepping. You must decide on your target and go in."
- Otto Skorzeny, Nazi Commando, "The Most Dangerous Man in Europe"

Skorzeny made headlines and another promotion when he led a group of well-trained German commandos in Operation Eiche (Operation Oak) to rescue Benito Mussolini in 1943 from a prison in Italy. Skorzeny was one of Hitler's "go-to" men on dangerous and difficult assignments and with the success of this rescue raid, he got promoted to Sturmbannfuhrer (Major) as well as being awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross.

As to developing a strategy for asymmetrical warfare where there is a real disparity between a traditional standing army and a terrorist insurgency group, Skorzeny had a plan.

Nazi "Werwolf Tactics Forerunner to Al Qaeda Tactics
Instead of uniformed regiments of soldiers fighting each other on a well-defined battlefield, the new strategy was to have some small roving bands of guerilla fighters attacking different priority targets and then melting back into the background of society. No large fighting units, only small units or cells. Skorzeny called this werwolf (German spelling of "werewolf") warfare. It was the related grandfather to ISIS terrorist cells.

This type of warfare is hard to counter because the opposing soldiers are not in a traditional military uniform. Nor are they working in a structured environment. It is more of a commando type or covert operations approach to warfare and is seen in contemporary terrorist groups like cells of ISIS.

Going back to when Skorzeny was perfecting these new ideas, a lack of full resources as well as highly trained personnel dictated a new approach to waging war and being creative with insurgency tactics.

The trail of training guerilla warfare and tactics may have started in Germany at the end of World War II, but it moved forward into Egypt, South America, and even into the United States after the war with Skorzeny as a paid consultant. Eventually, it spread into Al Qaeda through the efforts of Skorzeny and his subordinates with Yasser Arafat. Skorzeny was, in effect, a consultant for hire to whoever wanted his new tactical ideas including the United States Special Forces.

In recent years, this type of asymmetrical warfare has bled into the whole area of computers, data centers, and internet infrastructures. It raises the question of where should we be spending money on national defenses to fight the War on Terrorism? Do we buy more $1 billion air superiority fighters or develop new cyber-security tools, monitors, and counter-weapons?

Asymmetrical warfare that was born in the last days of the Third Reich, spread into the Middle East in the early Post-War Days and later meetings of Otto Skorzeny and Yasser Arafat. Now, cyberwarfare has grown out of this guerilla warfare approach.

—James Carlini, 2016


Carlini will be the Keynote Speaker on Intelligent Infrastructure & Cybersecurity at the CABA Intelligent Buildings and Digital Homes Forum in San Diego on April 26.

Carlini's book will be out at the end of this year. His current book, LOCATION LOCATION CONNECTIVITY is available on AMAZON

Copyright © 2016 - James Carlini, All Rights Reserved

More Stories By James Carlini

James Carlini, MBA, a certified Infrastructure Consultant, keynote speaker and former award-winning Adjunct Professor at Northwestern University, has advised on mission-critical networks. Clients include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, GLOBEX, and City of Chicago’s 911 Center. An expert witness in civil and federal courts on network infrastructure, he has worked with AT&T, Sprint and others.

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.twitter.com/JAMESCARLINI

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